Michael East

With Claims of Mafia Involvement, the Death of “The World’s Strongest Man” Continues to Haunt Montreal

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The world of professional wrestling is one that is tainted by decades of tragedy. From the infamous double-murder and suicide committed by Chris Benoit to the murder of Bruiser Brody, the spectre of death has never been far away from the squared circle. Equally, rumours have always persisted of links between “the business” and the criminal underworld, with the likes of the Cosa Nostra and the Yakuza once having interests in professional wrestling in the United States and Japan respectively. At this intersection of wrestling and organised crime comes Dino Bravo, one of the World Wrestling Federation’s (WWF, now WWE) most notable stars of the 1980s. Bravo would be gunned down in his own home in 1993. …


Did Scientists Receive the First-Ever Communication From Alien Life Way Back in 1977?

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It was on August 15, 1977, that Ohio State University’s Big Ear radio telescope received what many consider to be the most convincing scientific argument of extraterrestrial life — a signal from outer space. Discovered by astronomer Jerry R. Ehman when reviewing data, the 72-second event came from somewhere around the Sagittarius constellation. To this day, there is no agreed-upon explanation for what the telescope received, with opponents of the alien life theory suggesting natural phenomena or even a human-made source. It was on August 18 that the event would get its most widely known name, Ehman writing “WOW!” in the margins of computer printouts next to the letters “6EQUJ5”. Ehman was at the time a professor at Ohio State and also volunteered with SETI, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. …


Situated in an Idyllic Country Estate in Scotland, Overtoun Bridge Seemingly Drives Dogs to Commit Suicide… or Does It?

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There are many legends and myths associated with bridges across the world. They are often said in folklore to be places where spirits become trapped, being unable to cross over and becoming trapped between the physical world and the afterlife. Other legends tell that the souls of those that die by falling from bridges are cursed to haunt them forever. Others say that bridges are gateways for demons. These superstitions have given rise to legends such as the many “Devil’s Bridge” legends around the globe. …


Known in Sweden As the ‘Cutting Up Murder’, It Is a Blunt Name for Sweden’s Most Horrific Unsolved Case

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There are many types of murder and many differing reactions to the circumstances surrounding them. While all killings go rightfully condemned, some go beyond this natural reaction and bring about feelings of extreme revulsion and disgust. These crimes are those that stand out for their brutality and the callousness of the criminal behind them. One such murder is that of Catrine da Costa. The killing is so horrific that it opened up new discourse in Sweden about the way women were treated, being the inspiration behind the publication of Steig Larsson’s famous The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, entitled Men Who Hate Women in Sweden. …


The Intriguing Dahlsjö Case Has Enthralled Sweden for 55 Years

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July 29, 1965, started as seemingly another day in Gothenburg. It was the height of summer, Alma Cogan’s rendition of The Birds and the Bees was number one in the charts, and the sixties were in full swing. Check-jackets and coloured shirts were all the rage, and while the summer of love would be two years away, the atmosphere should have been joyous as Swedes soaked up the summer sun. However, this would be a day like no other in Sweden’s central port city, and instead of sun, the rain was pouring down. …


Does a “Computer” Found at the Bottom of the Ocean Prove the Ancients Were More Advanced Than We Ever Imagined?

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It was in 1900 that sponge divers made one of the most remarkable archaeological discoveries all time while diving off Point Glyphadia on the Greek island of Antikythera. 148 feet below the surface of the crisp blue Mediterranean was the wreck of a Roman cargo vessel, inside were many large ancient artefacts. There were bronze and marble statues, unique glass, jewellery and coins. These things alone would have been a fantastic find. However, in 1901, something else was found — an ancient form of a computer. It would change everything historians knew about the ability of the ancients.

It isn’t known how the Antikythera Mechanism came to be in the Roman ship, and some have speculated the item was plunder, being taken to form part of a parade by a triumphant Caesar in Rome. Some believe the device to have been the work of Hipparchus of Rhodes, though ancient sources suggest that Archimedes may have been ultimately responsible. After discovering the gears, archaeologists believed that the device was an astronomical clock. Still, it was far more complicated than that, and few thought it could ever have been built at the same time as everything else that was being pulled from the wreck. It would later be dated to around the second century BC. …


What Happened to the Young Woman Who Vanished From a Sleepy Swedish Town in 1992?

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Helena Andersson was 22 years old and carefree, her whole life seemingly ahead of her. However, that would all change on June 14, 1992, a hot summer’s day in Mariestad, a small town of around 15,000 in North-East Sweden. Helena had been out dancing with friends at a local hotel, enjoying herself. Tired, was ready to come home. She phoned shortly before closing time to tell her sister she had forgotten her keys, and during the same phone call, her sister insisted Helena get a taxi. However, she never came home. The next day, police searching the area for the young woman came across the only trace they ever found — her sandals laying in a pasture and her rings alongside the road Helena would have walked. …


Does the Loch Ness Monster, the World’s Most Famous Cryptid, Truly Exist?

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Loch Ness is a 23-mile freshwater loch in the Scottish Highlands. The stretch of water is the second-largest such loch in Scotland after Loch Lomond and also the second deepest after Loch Morar. Such is the vastness of the place that it contains more water than all the lakes in England and Wales combined, and the area is home to a variety of fish such as trout, salmon, pike and sturgeon. …


Was the Disappearance of a Seventeen-Year-Old Swedish Woman in 1948 Really Murder?

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Viola “Vivi” Widegren was born on May 2, 1931. She was a health care assistant and grew up on a farm in Västerbränna, Sweden. Her parents had previously run a small business and moved into the area after her mother became seriously ill through diabetes and tuberculosis. Viola’s father, Karl Widegren, worked as a timber surveyor and carer, looking after both his daughter and sick wife, his single income no doubt making life difficult. She died in 1937 when Viola was six, and he subsequently remarried in 1938, having another daughter, a half-sister to Viola. Despite limitations, the family was able to buy a new property in 1944 and a few years afterwards even added a second, renting it out to a mother and her two children. …


Did Satan Himself Visit the English County of Devon One Cold Night in 1855?

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It was on the night of February 8, 1855, that heavy snowfall covered the southern British counties of Devon and Dorset. The inclement weather would continue for days, and upon waking, villagers and townsfolk in the mostly rural locations were horrified to find cloven hoof prints at as many as thirty sites across the region. While you might not think this unusual, with goats to be expected in the countryside… these footprints were up to four inches long and the creature, whatever it was, seemingly walked on two legs…

The “Devil’s footprints” covered a distance between 40 and 100 miles and were between eight and sixteen inches apart and, while some were described as four inches long, most were in fact only an inch a half or two inches. Reports of the phenomenon came from across Devon, mostly centred around the Exe Estuary in the east and south of the region. However, there were reports of such Satanic footprints as far away as Dorset, the next county to the east. The tracks were mostly straight with no object seemingly phasing whatever creature was responsible, smoothly moving over haystacks, houses and rivers. The footprints even appeared on roofs, and according to some accounts were directed toward the country house of the Lord of Exeter. …

About

Michael East

Writer. Publisher. Designer. Writing primarily on history, socialist politics, true crime & folklore. Working toward a book. http://MichaelEastWriter.com

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